Midwest Passage Landscape Photography Exhibit

midwest passage

 

Friday night, we exhibited a modern interpretation of landscape photography in Landscape: Current Interpretations X=11, a group exhibition featuring works by local photographers working with traditional cameras and materials. This was the second exhibition in 2013 by Midwest Passage, a collective of Twin Cities photographers that favor film as their primary photographic capture media. Subjects ranged from more traditional representations of the landscape theme to hand-crafted, alternative/historic process, and abstract prints.

The exhibit was one night only on Friday July 26 from 6pm-10pm at Studio #201 in the California Building located at 2205 California St. NE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55418

Midwest Passage – In an age when most photographers have transitioned to digital cameras and all but a few professional photographic labs have closed, there exists a minority of photographers that use non-digital cameras as the means of realizing and expressing their art. The Midwest Passage collective formed in 2012 as an informal group of Twin Cities film photographers to share ideas, technique, and to critique each other’s work.

The exhibit included photographic works from the following artists: Thomas Bertilsson, Peter Boulay, Eduardo Colon, Osama Esid, Anthony Hoffmann, Paul Johnson, Victor Keller, Andrew Moxom, Reid Rejsa, Scott Stillman and Steve Zimmerman.

The exhibit was well attended and A LOT of fun! Thanks to all that attended and participated.

 

About scott

I live in Minneapolis Minnesota and have a passion for making portraits with view cameras and large format black and white film. In the last ten years, I have been drawn to older film cameras and large film formats up to 8x10 inch negatives. I also spend a fair amount of time perfecting recipes for pasta sauce, home-made pizza and vegetarian soup. When not engaged in the previously mentioned pursuits, I think about which 14,000 foot mountain will be number 7.
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